Posts Tagged With: olive oil

Vegan MoFo #12: Chinese-Style Vegetables

This was a lovely way to use up some of the produce in our fridge that we got from our garden.

chinese style vegetables

This recipe was found on page 171 of the 1978 Betty Crocker cookbook.

1 small head green cabbage (about 1 lb)
1 T olive oil
2 medium stalks celery, cut into thin diagonal slices (about 1 cup)
1 medium green bell pepper, sliced (about 1 cup)
1 large onion, chopped (about 3/4 cup)
1 tsp salt

Stir all together about 5 minutes over medium heat until tender.

chinese style vegetables

We ate them with pinto beans, rice, and soy sauce, but they were really yummy on their own, too. (This comes from a celeryphobe.) And really easy.

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Categories: challenges, gluten-free, lunch, nut-free, recipes, soy-free, vegan, vegan mofo, vegan mofo 2012, vegetables | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Chicken Out: Chickenless Pot Pie

We already talked about my favourite beef substitute in the previous post. So, what about chicken? Chicken a la king, chicken potpie, chicken nuggets? Must we give up such deliciousness?

Hardly. The answer can be found in a tasty, unassuming little legume called a garbanzo. Or a chickpea. (Is that a regional thing, calling it one or the other?)

Anyway. Seasoned with a little chicken seasoning during cooking, garbanzo beans make an excellent substitute. And, since Thanksgiving is this week, I’m going to share with you a recipe I have done almost every year for Thanksgiving since I got married: Chickenless Pot Pie.

This recipe is not vegan. Next week, I’ll share options of how to make a vegan version of the same thing.

Chickenless Pot Pie

POT PIE OMNOMNOM

1 double pie crust (top and bottom)
2 carrots, chopped or sliced
1 stalk celery, sliced
1/4 c onion, chopped
1 clove garlic, crushed or chopped
1 T olive oil
1 can cream of mushroom soup
2-3 c cooked garbanzo beans (reserve liquid)
3/4 c frozen peas
3/4 c frozen corn

Sauté carrots, celery, onion, and garlic in the olive oil until tender.

Stir in cream of mushroom soup. Add garbanzo liquid until it is a nice consistency. Stir in garbanzos, peas, and corn.

For my crust, I added about a teaspoon or so of thyme to the pastry.

Bake at 425 for 30-40 minutes, until golden brown and bubbling.

Where are you from, and do you call them garbanzos or chickpeas?

Categories: entrees, nut-free, recipes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Delicious Homemade Bread Anyone Can Bake

Someone once said:

If girls were taught how to cook, especially how to make good bread, their education would be of far greater value.

(Boys can benefit too!)

Now, how about a recipe using delicious grainy goodness?

I’ve had a lot of issues making bread. Most people have. But because I usually can’t bring myself to shell out $4 or more for a loaf of bread that’s actually reasonably healthy, I’ve made it myself. With endless issues. It sank. Or it was gooey. Or it felt like I should sell it to the third little pig for his house. You name it, it’s happened to me. I tried all the recipes friends and family would throw at me and checked out book after book from the library, and while I’d occasionally get a freak good result, the frustration and failure was monumental. I gave up for a long time and my husband took over the breadmaking for several months.

UNTIL I BEGAN USING THIS RECIPE, and I have never had a failed loaf of bread since (even though I continued on to modify it slightly, because that’s how I roll).

The measurements in black text make 1 loaf. The numbers in red are a double recipe for 2 loaves. I recommend making just one loaf for starters.

Ingredients:
1.5 (3) c warm water (if you’re going by a thermometer, 105-115 degrees; I just stick my finger in it)
1.5 (3) Tbsp sweetener of choice – agave, honey, or sugar
1.5 (3) Tbsp yeast
1/4 c (3/4c) ground flaxseed (optional)
1.5 (3) Tbsp olive oil
1.5 (3) tsp salt
1.5 (3) c white flour or (3/4 c) gluten flour
3-4.5 (6-9) c whole wheat flour

Instructions:
Place warm water in a large bowl. Add yeast and sweetener and whisk to dissolve yeast. Let sit for about 5 minutes, until you see the yeast bubbling and frothing rabidly on top of the water. (This is called proofing the yeast, to make sure it’s alive and functional.)

Yeast and sugar

Here is my yeast with three blops of brown sugar.

Whisked Up

Now I’ve added the 3 cups of warm water and whisked it up.

Frothing Yeastiness

IT’S ALIIIIIIIIIIIIIVE

Add flaxseed, oil, and salt. Add the white flour and stir 1-2 minutes. This will help develop the gluten to make a light loaf of bread.

Flaxseed, oil, and salt

Adding in my ground flaxseed, oil (corn oil in this case), and salt.

Add remaining whole wheat flour about a cup at a time until you can handle the dough without it sticking to your hands. [I don’t really count the cups I put in; I just add until it feels right, because it seems to vary depending on weather and temperature and other factors.]

Knead the dough in the bowl or on a floured surface for 5-10 minutes. Add flour as needed to keep dough from sticking to your hands. Place dough in an oiled bowl, cover with a clean, damp towel, and let rise in a warm place approximately an hour until doubled. [Just keep an eye on it, because I find it often will double long before an hour hits, and you want to not let the yeast die out. 30-45 minutes is usually what I do.]

Stirring

Stirring in my flour

Kneaded lump

It’s all kneaded and ready to rise. (Yes, the picture is blurry. I have lousy lighting conditions in my current place of abode.)

Punch down the risen dough and knead a little to work out air bubbles. Shape into a loaf (or two loaves) (or divide dough into 12-16 equal blobs and shape into buns!) and place in oiled bread pan (or cookie sheets for buns). Cover with towel again and let rise 30 minutes approximately, until nearly doubled. Preheat the oven to 350 during this time. [It will continue to rise the first minute or so in the hot oven, sometimes quite dramatically!]

First Rising

After rising for a while, it’s ready to punch down and shape into loaves!

Division

Here I’ve cut the blob of dough in two equal parts.

Rolling out the air bubbles

You can squish the bubbles out by hand if you like; I usually roll it out and then roll it up tightly.

Second rise

In the loaf pans ready to rise the second time.

After rising

Ready to go into the oven to bake!

Bake the loaf for 30 minutes, until golden brown and sounding hollow when tapped on the bottom. [After about 30 minutes, I take the loaf out of the pan and just put it right on the oven rack for another 10 minutes or so. This gets a good crust on the bottom and seems to help keep the bread from being soggy.] (Buns usually go 20-25 minutes, and you can just turn them upside down on the cookie sheets to crisp up the bottom.) Cool on a cooling rack.

All done!

Out of the oven, cooling on a cooling rack!

I also let the bread sit out at least overnight before putting it away. 24 hours would be ideal. It really cures it nicely.

In my next post, I’ll share some substitutionary ideas you can try out once you’ve mastered the plain template above!

Categories: around the kitchen, bread, nut-free, recipes, soy-free, vegan | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

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